Factors associated with nosocomial SARS-CoV transmission among healthcare workers in Hanoi, Vietnam, 2003

Từ Thư viện Khoa học VLOS
Bước tới: chuyển hướng, tìm kiếm
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Factors associated with nosocomial SARS-CoV transmission among healthcare workers in Hanoi, Vietnam, 2003.
 Tạp chí BMC Public Health 2006 August; 14 (6):207
 Tác giả   Reynolds MG, Anh BH, Thu VH, Montgomery JM, Bausch DG, Shah JJ, Maloney S, Leitmeyer KC, Huy VQ, Horby P, Plant AY, Uyeki TM
 Nơi thực hiện   National Centers for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA
 Từ khóa   Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS), SARS-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV), respiratory infections,
  DOI   [ URL]  [ PDF]

Abstract

BACKGROUND: In March of 2003, an outbreak of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) occurred in Northern Vietnam. This outbreak began when a traveler arriving from Hong Kong sought medical care at a small hospital (Hospital A) in Hanoi, initiating a serious and substantial transmission event within the hospital, and subsequent limited spread within the community. METHODS: We surveyed Hospital A personnel for exposure to the index patient and for symptoms of disease during the outbreak. Additionally, serum specimens were collected and assayed for antibody to SARS-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV) antibody and job-specific attack rates were calculated. A nested case-control analysis was performed to assess risk factors for acquiring SARS-CoV infection. RESULTS: One hundred and fifty-three of 193 (79.3%) clinical and non-clinical staff consented to participate. Excluding job categories with < 3 workers, the highest SARS attack rates occurred among nurses who worked in the outpatient and inpatient general wards (57.1, 47.4%, respectively). Nurses assigned to the operating room/intensive care unit, experienced the lowest attack rates (7.1%) among all clinical staff. Serologic evidence of SARS-CoV infection was detected in 4 individuals, including 2 non-clinical workers, who had not previously been identified as SARS cases; none reported having had fever or cough. Entering the index patient's room and having seen (viewed) the patient were the behaviors associated with highest risk for infection by univariate analysis (odds ratios 20.0, 14.0; 95% confidence intervals 4.1-97.1, 3.6-55.3, respectively). CONCLUSION: This study highlights job categories and activities associated with increased risk for SARS-CoV infection and demonstrates that a broad diversity of hospital workers may be vulnerable during an outbreak. These findings may help guide recommendations for the protection of vulnerable occupational groups and may have implications for other respiratory infections such as influenza.

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